Tue. Oct 26th, 2021

    Maui News | Maui Headlines and Top Stories

    Maui News | Maui Headlines and Top Stories

    This article is about Maui is the second largest island on the islands of Hawaii. For the figure in Polynesian mythology, see Māui (mythology). For other uses, see Maui (disambiguation).
    Maui: Maui Headlines and Top Stories
    Nickname: The Valley Isle
    Maui Landsat Photo.jpg
    Landsat satellite image of Maui. The small Maui News and Maui Headlines and Top Stories to the southwest is Kahoʻolawe.
    Highest elevation 10,023 ft (3055 m)
    Highest point Haleakalā
    United States
    Flower Lokelani
    Color ʻĀkala (pink)
    Largest settlement Kahului
    Demographics Maui Headlines and Top Stories.
    Population 168,307 (2021)
    Pop. density 162/sq mi (62.5/km2)
    Maui (center right, surrounded by Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and Kahoʻolawe) as seen from the International Space Station

    Maui The 2nd largest Hawaiian Island

    The island of Maui (/ˈmaʊ.i/; Hawaiian) is the second-largest of the Hawaiian Islands at 727.2 square miles (1,883 km2) and is the 17th largest island in the United States. Maui is part of the State of Hawaii and is the largest of Maui County’s four islands, which include Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and unpopulated Kahoʻolawe. In 2010, Maui had a population of 144,444, third-highest of the Hawaiian Islands, behind that of Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi Island. Kahului is the largest census-designated place (CDP) on the island with a population of 26,337 as of 2010 and is the commercial and financial hub of the island. Wailuku is the seat of Maui County and is the third-largest CDP as of 2010. Other significant places include Kīhei (including Wailea and Makena in the Kihei Town CDP, the island’s second-most-populated CDP), Lāhainā (including Kāʻanapali and Kapalua in the Lāhainā Town CDP), Makawao, Pukalani, Pāʻia, Kula, Haʻikū, and Hāna.

    Maui News | Maui Headlines and Top Stories

    Native Hawaiian tradition gives the origin of the island’s name in the legend of Hawaiʻiloa, the navigator credited with discovery of the Hawaiian Islands. According to it, Hawaiʻiloa named the island after his son, who in turn was named for the demigod Māui. The earlier name of Maui was ʻIhikapalaumaewa. The Island of Maui is also called the “Valley Isle” for the large isthmus separating its northwestern and southeastern volcanic masses.

    Maui Geology and Topography

    Maui’s diverse landscapes are the result of a unique combination of geology, topography, and climate. Each volcanic cone in the chain of the Hawaiian Islands is built of dark, iron-rich/quartz-poor rocks, which poured out of thousands of vents as highly fluid lava over a period of millions of years. Several of the volcanoes were close enough to each other that lava flows on their flanks overlapped one another, merging into a single island. Maui is such a “volcanic doublet,” formed from two shield volcanoes that overlapped one another to form an isthmus between them.
    Looking into the Haleakalā crater
    Volcanic rocks protrude on a Maui beach

    The older, western volcano has been eroded considerably and is cut by numerous drainages, forming the peaks of the West Maui Mountains (in Hawaiian, Mauna Kahalawai). Puʻu Kukui is the highest of the peaks at 5,788 feet (1,764 m). The larger, younger volcano to the east, Haleakalā, rises to more than 10,000 feet (3,000 m) above sea level, and measures 5 miles (8.0 km) from seafloor to summit.

    Maui News | Maui Headlines and Top Stories

    The eastern flanks of both volcanoes are cut by deeply incised valleys and steep-sided ravines that run downslope to the rocky, windswept shoreline. The valley-like Isthmus of Maui that separates the two volcanic masses was formed by sandy erosional deposits.

    Maui’s last eruption (originating in Haleakalā’s Southwest Rift Zone) occurred around 1790; two of the resulting lava flows are located (1) at Cape Kīnaʻu between ʻĀhihi Bay and La Perouse Bay on the southwest shore of East Maui, and (2) at Makaluapuna Point on Honokahua Bay on the northwest shore of West Maui. Considered to be dormant by volcanologists, Haleakalā is certainly capable of further eruptions.

    Maui is part of a much larger unit, Maui Nui, that includes the islands of Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Molokaʻi, and the now submerged Penguin Bank. During periods of reduced sea level, including as recently as 20,000 years ago, they are joined together as a single island due to the shallowness of the channels between them.

    Main article: Climate of Hawaii

    This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
    Rainbow over the West Maui Mountains after rainfall in Kāʻanapali

    The climate of the Hawaiian Islands is characterized by a two-season year, tropical and uniform temperatures everywhere (except at high elevations), marked geographic differences in rainfall, high relative humidity, extensive cloud formations (except on the driest coasts and at high elevations), and dominant trade-wind flow (especially at elevations below a few thousand feet). Maui itself has a wide range of climatic conditions and weather patterns that are influenced by several different factors in the physical environment:

    Maui News | Maui Headlines and Top Stories

    Maui displays a unique and diverse set of climatic conditions, each of which is specific to a loosely defined sub-region of the island. These sub-regions are defined by major physiographic features (such as mountains and valleys) and by location on the windward or leeward side of the island.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    error: Content is protected !!